Cresskill: SAT Full-Length Test & Review for April 6-10, 2015

CLICK HERE to view the schedule flyer.

This Day in History: March 1, 1919

The March First Movement may be the most significant event in modern Korean history that is routinely ignored. In the 1980s, during the Democratization movement in South Korea, student groups often used the March First Movement (along with the April Revolution of 1960) as touchstones for reformist activity and political change. In the 1990s, the March First Movement served as a historical paradigm for reunification sentiments. But lately, during the past decade, the March First Movement has been relegated to a footnote in history. Perhaps it has become such because the movement was a failure: It did not (like the American Revolution after which it was modeled) lead to a successful revolution. Korea had been annexed by Japan nine years earlier. The response of the Japanese police and military to the movement was brutal and swift. Tens of thousands of Koreans were jailed or imprisoned. The number of Koreans executed or killed in protest gatherings is still debated among scholars — though most agree that the number is also in the thousands. A year after the movement began, it ended with Korea still being a colony of Japan — a circumstance that would take a world war to change twenty-five years later.

But we know that the suppression of the movement lasted over a year and covered the entire peninsula. This fact alone makes the March First Movement quite remarkable. For a country that has fought a civil war (and technically still is, nearly sixty years later) and remains divided as two separate nations — who are as diametrically opposed as any two nations can be — the march First Movement serves as a poignant reminder that once upon a time the inhabitants of a stretch of land delineated from the rest of Asia by seas and mountains thought of themselves as one country, one people.

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The March First Proclamation of Korean Independence (in English)

The March First Proclamation of Korean Independence (in Korean)

Text & Pictures

33 Representatives

Map of Korea

Cresskill: SAT Full-Length Test & Review – February 2015

CLICK HERE to view the schedule flyer.

Cresskill: Early 2015 Winter Seminars

Happy New Year!

Here are the upcoming seminars for Cresskill.
Students and parents are both welcome.

All seminars are conducted in English by Sunny.

CLICK HERE to see the flyer or just look below for all the details.

“The COLLEGE ADMISSIONS Process”

For: Grades 10-11
Speaker: Sunny

• JAN 31 (SAT) @ 6 PM
• JAN 12 (THU) @ 7 PM

“Are You Ready For The NEW SAT?”

For: Grades 8-10
Speaker: Sunny

• FEB 5 (THU) @ 7 PM
• FEB 7 (SAT) @ 6 PM

Paramus: 2015 Spring Schedule Posted

Now available on CATALOG > Schedules page.

Cresskill: 2015 Spring Schedule Posted

Now available on CATALOG > Schedules page.

Cresskill: SAT Subject Test Review for May & June 2015

CLICK HERE to view the schedule flyer.

Cresskill: Christmas Break SAT Full-Length Test Review

Christmas Break (Dec. 26 – Jan. 3)

Students take a full-length assigned SAT test, analyzed by computer and reviewed by a teacher.

When:
12/26, 12/29 – 1/2 (MON-FRI, 10-3 PM)
12/27 + 1/3 (SAT, 1-6 PM)
12/28 (SUN, 3-8 PM)
CLOSED ON NEW YEAR’S DAY

Fee is $50 per day.

Please call to reserve a seat:
(201) 569-6555.

CLICK HERE to view the flyer.

Cresskill: November SAT Full-Length Test Review

For SAT exams taken in November and December.

Students take a full-length assigned SAT test, analyzed by computer and reviewed by a teacher.

Dates:
November 6-7 (THU-FRI)
November 27-28 (THU-FRI)

Time:
10 AM – 3 PM

Fee is $50 per day.

Please call to reserve a seat:
(201) 569-6555.

CLICK HERE to view the flyer.

Paramus: 2014-15 Fall & Winter Schedule Posted

Now available on CATALOG > Schedules page.